Home is where the heart is. Whether on water or land, the essence of architecture – both land-based and naval – is about creating a space that is then brought to life through passion and vision. That ever-so-important hub where life happens, grounding us and providing emotional and physical security. But it’s also a canvas for self-expression, an outward projection of our inner personalities. And when it comes to a yacht, a vehicle for adventure.
So, what happens in the timeframe from when a client signs off on a design to the completion date? How does the dream become reality? The starting point for any project is the shaping of a vision. The role of an interior outfitter is to make that vision come to life. To successfully translate an idea captured on paper into a solid construction, and (when it comes to the yachting industry) all the while paying homage to the number one rule: bespoke is king.

Rendering of MY DAR © Valentina Zannier, Nuvolari Lenard

But it goes a lot deeper than simply building to a brief. It’s about finding a balance between planning and execution. It takes hundreds of artisans, each one expert in their unique craft working alongside one another to a synchronised timeline to build a superyacht. In the spirit of a highly-choreographed ballet, they work in unison to a tight deadline, a strict budget, and exacting standards.

And this is where the world of land-based architecture can learn something from the yacht industry. There is no halt to proceedings for bad weather. There are no excuses for delay. Nothing short of perfection will suffice. And suppliers work in such tight harmony that to disrespect another’s workspace is to show disregard for the entire project.

© List GC

In the luxury sphere, the desire to have design continuity throughout all aspects of life, from a home to a superyacht to a private jet, presents a challenge that demands experience, planning and foresight. It requires learning from other disciplines, and the lending of new ideas. From the framing of views and the way that spaces flow from one to another, to the use of superior materials and precise detailing. So, it goes without saying that the capabilities that have become the accepted everyday norm on a yacht build translate perfectly to a commercial or residential project.

Collaboration sits at the heart of it. Adept at marrying physical constraints with engineering solutions, regulatory requirements and prized workmanship, these valued practices are all the while executed with the utmost discretion for both the owner and yacht.

The interior outfitter does not discriminate; whether an 80m superyacht or a mountain chalet in the foothills of the French Alps, high-end, luxurious interiors are the endgame. If bespoke is king, then the interior outfitter wears the crown.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Julia Zaltzman is a journalist and editor published in a variety of publications, including Robb Report, Centurion, Yachts International and The Telegraph. She is Editor of SuperYacht Industry, and Yachting & Property Editor of Simply Abu Dhabi.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Julia Zaltzman is a journalist and editor published in a variety of publications, including Robb Report, Centurion, Yachts International and The Telegraph. She is Editor of SuperYacht Industry, and Yachting & Property Editor of Simply Abu Dhabi.